Our Heritage

Cadogan’s long association with Chelsea began when Charles, Baron Cadogan wed Elizabeth Sloane over 300 years ago. Since that time, the family and place have grown together – evolving the Cadogan Estate into one of London’s most characterful and distinctive neighbourhoods.

C. 1000 AD

Cadogan Origins

CADWGAN AP ELYSTAN GLODRYDD
(CADOGAN SON OF ELYSTAN GLODRYDD)

Of the 5th Royal Tribe of Wales, Prince of Fferlys. The central component of the Cadogan Arms are those of Cadwgan ap Elystan's – the family's ancient ancestor.

1603 - 1714

Stuart Era

1660 — 1753

SIR HANS SLOANE

Sir Hans Sloane is the great enlightenment figure whose presence is felt in Chelsea to this day: Sloane Square, Sloane Street and Hans Town are all named after him. A renowned physician, serving three consecutive monarchs, he was also president of the Royal Society and inventor of drinking chocolate (a recipe later sold to Cadbury’s). Sloane was the greatest antiquary of his age and on his death his great collections (of mineral, botanical, and zoological specimens, ethnographic objects, antiquities, prints, drawings, books and manuscripts) were offered to the nation, forming the British Museum. They were later split into the British Library and Natural History Museums. The younger of Sloane’s two daughters, Elizabeth, married into the
 Cadogan family.

Sir Hans Sloane is the great enlightenment figure whose presence is felt in Chelsea to this day: Sloane Square, Sloane Street and Hans Town are all named after him. A renowned physician, serving three consecutive monarchs, he was also president of the Royal Society and inventor of drinking chocolate (a recipe later sold to Cadbury’s). Sloane was the greatest antiquary of his age and on his death his great collections (of mineral, botanical, and zoological specimens, ethnographic objects, antiquities, prints, drawings, books and manuscripts) were offered to the nation, forming the British Museum. They were later split into the British Library and Natural History Museums. The younger of Sloane’s two daughters, Elizabeth, married into the
 Cadogan family.

THE ROYAL HOSPITAL, CHELSEA
BY SIR CHRISTOPHER WREN
1672 - 1726

William, 1st earl Cadogan

An accomplished soldier and diplomat, he rose to be the Duke of Marlborough’s Quartermaster General during the War of the Spanish Succession and was later promoted to Lieutenant General (1709) and Master-General of the Ordnance (1722). At various times he also held the offices of MP for Woodstock, Master of the Robes and Governor of the Isle of Wight. William was awarded the Baronetcy in 1716, followed by the Earldom in 1718.

An accomplished soldier and diplomat, he rose to be the Duke of Marlborough’s Quartermaster General during the War of the Spanish Succession and was later promoted to Lieutenant General (1709) and Master-General of the Ordnance (1722). At various times he also held the offices of MP for Woodstock, Master of the Robes and Governor of the Isle of Wight. William was awarded the Baronetcy in 1716, followed by the Earldom in 1718.

1685 — 1776

CHARLES, 2ND BARON CADOGAN & ELIZABETH SLOANE

The 1st Earl had no sons and on his death, in 1726, the lesser title of Baron passed to his younger brother Charles and the Earldom fell into abeyance.

1704

THE BATTLE OF BLENHEIM

WAR OF THE SPANISH SUCCESSION
(1701 — 1714)

William Cadogan’s heroic actions at the Battle of Blenheim were rewarded with an elevation to the peerage – initially being granted a Baronetcy and later an Earldom.

1712

SIR HANS SLOANE PURCHASES MANOR OF CHELSEA

When William Cheyne sold ‘The Manor of Chelsea’ to Sloane in 1712 it included 11 great houses, a selection of tenements, the advowson of Chelsea church (the right to appoint members of clergy) and 166 acres. Sloane purchased the Manor so that he might display his great collections at the impressive Manor House (once owned by Henry VIII).

When William Cheyne sold ‘The Manor of Chelsea’ to Sloane in 1712 it included 11 great houses, a selection of tenements, the advowson of Chelsea church (the right to appoint members of clergy) and 166 acres. Sloane purchased the Manor so that he might display his great collections at the impressive Manor House (once owned by Henry VIII).

THE ROTUNDA, RANLEIGH GARDEN

1714 — 1830

Georgian Era

1724

Daniel Defoe

When Daniel Defoe (author of Robinson Crusoe) travelled the length of the country and penned The Tour of the Whole Island of Great Britain, he found ‘Chelsey’ to be a ‘town of palaces’ a description of the endless run of grand houses viewable from a boat on the Thames (including The Royal Hospital, Chelsea Manor House and Beaufort House). These beautiful buildings often had grounds sweeping down to the water’s edge.

When Daniel Defoe (author of Robinson Crusoe) travelled the length of the country and penned The Tour of the Whole Island of Great Britain, he found ‘Chelsey’ to be a ‘town of palaces’ a description of the endless run of grand houses viewable from a boat on the Thames (including The Royal Hospital, Chelsea Manor House and Beaufort House). These beautiful buildings often had grounds sweeping down to the water’s edge.

1717

Marriage of Charles, 2nd Baron Cadogan to Elizabeth Sloane

It is through this union that the stewardship of Chelsea passed into the Cadogan family and the Cadogan Estate in Chelsea established.

1728 - 1807

Charles Sloane
 Cadogan

1st Earl New Creation

Charles ‘Sloane’ Cadogan, the son of the 2nd Baron and Elizabeth, inherited the Estate in 1776. He married twice (his first wife died young) and had 14 children. He was at times an MP, Surveyor of his Majesty’s Gardens and Waters, Treasurer to the Duke of York and Master Worker of His Majesty’s Mint. The Earldom was reinstated in 1800.

Charles ‘Sloane’ Cadogan, the son of the 2nd Baron and Elizabeth, inherited the Estate in 1776. He married twice (his first wife died young) and had 14 children. He was at times an MP, Surveyor of his Majesty’s Gardens and Waters, Treasurer to the Duke of York and Master Worker of His Majesty’s Mint. The Earldom was reinstated in 1800.

“Chelsey, a town of palaces.”

Daniel Defoe
1777

Lease for ‘Hans Town’ sold to architect
Henry Holland

At this time in London boundaries were viewed to end at Hyde Park Corner, thus Hans Town was a ‘new town’ built in the countryside. Holland designed the street layout, creating Sloane Square and Sloane Street; linking Knightsbridge with the King’s Road. He built houses, as well as selling speculative building rights on the huge 90-acre development site

At this time in London boundaries were viewed to end at Hyde Park Corner, thus Hans Town was a ‘new town’ built in the countryside. Holland designed the street layout, creating Sloane Square and Sloane Street; linking Knightsbridge with the King’s Road. He built houses, as well as selling speculative building rights on the huge 90-acre development site

123 SLOANE STREET
1769 RICHARDSON MAP
1749 - 1832

Charles, 2nd Earl
 Cadogan

Eldest son of Charles ‘Sloane’ Cadogan, Charles junior famously undertook a Grand Tour of Europe, but unfortunately inherited his mother’s illness (psychosis). The Earldom passed to him on his father’s death in 1807, however he was too ill to run the Estate so it was looked after by Trustees.

Eldest son of Charles ‘Sloane’ Cadogan, Charles junior famously undertook a Grand Tour of Europe, but unfortunately inherited his mother’s illness (psychosis). The Earldom passed to him on his father’s death in 1807, however he was too ill to run the Estate so it was looked after by Trustees.

1811 - 1837

REGENCY Era

1811

George Cadogan was given command of
 HMS Havannah

HMS Havannah – in 1811 George Cadogan was given command of HMS Havannah, a 36-gun fifth rate frigate involved in the 1813/14 action that finally defeated France and drove Napoleon into exile. In 1815, Cadogan returned to Britain and was made Companion of the Order of the Bath.

HMS Havannah – in 1811 George Cadogan was given command of HMS Havannah, a 36-gun fifth rate frigate involved in the 1813/14 action that finally defeated France and drove Napoleon into exile. In 1815, Cadogan returned to Britain and was made Companion of the Order of the Bath.

1717

Admiral George
 Cadogan, 3rd Earl
 Cadogan

George Cadogan had seven elder brothers. He joined the navy and worked his way up the ranks in a glittering career to finally become an Admiral. Cadogan saw action throughout Europe before inheriting the Earldom in 1832.

George Cadogan had seven elder brothers. He joined the navy and worked his way up the ranks in a glittering career to finally become an Admiral. Cadogan saw action throughout Europe before inheriting the Earldom in 1832.

23 HANS PLACE
1749 - 1832

The King’s ‘Private’ Road becomes public

Originally built in the second half of the 17th Century as a private road for King Charles II to travel between London and his palace at Hampton Court, traffic was initially restricted to the King’s retinue. Business along the road was confined to market gardens, dairies and bee keeping, to ensure pleasant views from his carriage. The route was protected by a series of toll gates and only those with a special token (pictured) could pass. The route became an ordinary public highway in 1830.

Originally built in the second half of the 17th Century as a private road for King Charles II to travel between London and his palace at Hampton Court, traffic was initially restricted to the King’s retinue. Business along the road was confined to market gardens, dairies and bee keeping, to ensure pleasant views from his carriage. The route was protected by a series of toll gates and only those with a special token (pictured) could pass. The route became an ordinary public highway in 1830.

1837 - 1901

Victorian Era

1812 - 1873

Henry, 4th Earl 
Cadogan

Henry, Viscount Chelsea (eldest son of George, 3rd Earl Cadogan) married the Duke of Wellington’s daughter. He had a diplomatic career and later inherited the earldom at the age of 52.

OPHELIA,
JOHN EVERETT MILLAIS
J M W TURNER,
THE FIGHTING TEMERAIRE
1840's onwards

Chelsea artists

From the mid-19th century onwards, Chelsea became known as an artistic and bohemian haven. Artists drawn to its picturesque houses and riverside views included J M W Turner (1775 - 1851), and James McNeill Whistler (1834 - 1903). Pre-Raphaelite Dante Gabriel Rossetti (1828 - 1882) lived at Cheyne Walk, where he kept exotic animals including wombats and noisy peacocks and where William Morris (1834 - 1896) and Edward Burne-Jones (1833 - 1898) were frequent visitors. William Holman Hunt (1827 - 1910) and Walter Greaves (1846 - 1930) inhabited Chelsea artists’ studios.

From the mid-19th century onwards, Chelsea became known as an artistic and bohemian haven. Artists drawn to its picturesque houses and riverside views included J M W Turner (1775 - 1851), and James McNeill Whistler (1834 - 1903). Pre-Raphaelite Dante Gabriel Rossetti (1828 - 1882) lived at Cheyne Walk, where he kept exotic animals including wombats and noisy peacocks and where William Morris (1834 - 1896) and Edward Burne-Jones (1833 - 1898) were frequent visitors. William Holman Hunt (1827 - 1910) and Walter Greaves (1846 - 1930) inhabited Chelsea artists’ studios.

Pre-Raphaelite
Circle

1868

Sloane Square Station Opened

The station, built by the Metropolitan District Railway Company, linked Chelsea to the contemporary metropolitan infrastructure, increasing accessibility and encouraging modernisation.

The station, built by the Metropolitan District Railway Company, linked Chelsea to the contemporary metropolitan infrastructure, increasing accessibility and encouraging modernisation.

TITE STREET
THE PLACE OF OSCAR
WILDE’S ARREST 6TH APRIL 1895,
IN ROOM NO. 118
1840 - 1915

George, 5th Earl
 Cadogan

'Maker of the modern estate’, he shaped much of what the eye sees today, including the famous red brick for which the area is renowned. A successful politician and statesman, the 5th Earl served in governments under Disraeli and Salisbury as Under Secretary for War, Lord Privy Seal and Lord Lieutenant of Ireland, as well as being Chelsea’s first elected Mayor. During this time the Cadogan’s London home was Chelsea House, a grand building which once stood on the corner of the north terrace of Cadogan Place and Lowndes Street, whilst their country seat was Culford Hall, Suffolk.

'Maker of the modern estate’, he shaped much of what the eye sees today, including the famous red brick for which the area is renowned. A successful politician and statesman, the 5th Earl served in governments under Disraeli and Salisbury as Under Secretary for War, Lord Privy Seal and Lord Lieutenant of Ireland, as well as being Chelsea’s first elected Mayor. During this time the Cadogan’s London home was Chelsea House, a grand building which once stood on the corner of the north terrace of Cadogan Place and Lowndes Street, whilst their country seat was Culford Hall, Suffolk.

1877 - 1900

Chelsea rebuilt in the
 New Queen Anne Style

Major wide-scale redevelopment of the Estate, led by the 5th Earl, made much needed improvements. Georgian buildings, fallen into a state of disrepair and unfit for modern living, were rebuilt in a new red brick signature style, so epitomising the area it was coined ‘Pont Street Dutch’. Cadogan gave land and created buildings for the local community, such as Chelsea Hospital for Women, Holy Trinity Church and Chelsea Town Hall

Major wide-scale redevelopment of the Estate, led by the 5th Earl, made much needed improvements. Georgian buildings, fallen into a state of disrepair and unfit for modern living, were rebuilt in a new red brick signature style, so epitomising the area it was coined ‘Pont Street Dutch’. Cadogan gave land and created buildings for the local community, such as Chelsea Hospital for Women, Holy Trinity Church and Chelsea Town Hall

1874

Chelsea Embankment finished

The Chelsea Embankment, engineered by Joseph Bazalgette, transformed the riverside. The new, wide Embankment road incorporated a massive sewer underneath, which both hugely improved the quality of the river, as well as providing an agreeable promenade for carriages and pedestrians at street level.

The Chelsea Embankment, engineered by Joseph Bazalgette, transformed the riverside. The new, wide Embankment road incorporated a massive sewer underneath, which both hugely improved the quality of the river, as well as providing an agreeable promenade for carriages and pedestrians at street level.

1874

Gerald Oakley, 6th Earl Cadogan

A sportsman, naturalist and keen birdwatcher, he was chairman of the British Olympic Council, Trustee of the British Museum and President of Chelsea Football Club.

A sportsman, naturalist and keen birdwatcher, he was chairman of the British Olympic Council, Trustee of the British Museum and President of Chelsea Football Club.

52 CADOGAN SQUARE

1900 — 2000

20th CENTURY

CADOGAN HALL FIRST OPENED IN 1907, ORIGINALLY AS A CHURCH, DESIGNED BY ROBERT FELLOWES CHISHOLM
1920’S SLOANE SQUARE
1930's

Redevelopment of sloane square

Improvements included a new road layout - changing the then crossroads into the roundabout we know today, as well as creating a modern tube station (later destroyed by a bomb in 1940 and again rebuilt after the war). The western side of the Square was transformed by the new Peter Jones, a purpose-built department store with its sweeping art deco lines and elegant glass curtain wall.

Improvements included a new road layout - changing the then crossroads into the roundabout we know today, as well as creating a modern tube station (later destroyed by a bomb in 1940 and again rebuilt after the war). The western side of the Square was transformed by the new Peter Jones, a purpose-built department store with its sweeping art deco lines and elegant glass curtain wall.

1914 – 1918

During WW1

Duke of York Square was the headquarters of the London Irish Regiment and it was besieged by men wanting to join up. A Bibesco hut sprang up on Sloane Square to provide meals for men stationed at Chelsea Barracks and 18 Cadogan Gardens became Lady Mountgarret’s 14-bed hospital.

Duke of York Square was the headquarters of the London Irish Regiment and it was besieged by men wanting to join up. A Bibesco hut sprang up on Sloane Square to provide meals for men stationed at Chelsea Barracks and 18 Cadogan Gardens became Lady Mountgarret’s 14-bed hospital.

1900 – 1950

Chelsea’s ‘Bright Young People’

Chelsea’s popularity with ‘artists’ – painters, literary lights, actors, musicians and creatives – continued into the 20th century. It had managed to establish a reputation as home to both polite society and bohemianism, further strengthened by institutions such as The Chelsea Arts Club with its wild, lavish annual balls and The Royal Court Theatre with its ground-breaking shows.

Chelsea’s popularity with ‘artists’ – painters, literary lights, actors, musicians and creatives – continued into the 20th century. It had managed to establish a reputation as home to both polite society and bohemianism, further strengthened by institutions such as The Chelsea Arts Club with its wild, lavish annual balls and The Royal Court Theatre with its ground-breaking shows.

1939 – 1945

During WW2

Sloane Square station was destroyed, along with Sloane Court East, where American troops were stationed. The Estate was fully committed to the war effort – whole terraces were given over to house troops, Cadogan Square and Cadogan Place gardens were requisitioned and soldiers dug in with anti-aircraft guns, while barrage balloons floated above.

Sloane Square station was destroyed, along with Sloane Court East, where American troops were stationed. The Estate was fully committed to the war effort – whole terraces were given over to house troops, Cadogan Square and Cadogan Place gardens were requisitioned and soldiers dug in with anti-aircraft guns, while barrage balloons floated above.

1914- 1997

William, 7th Earl Cadogan

A war hero, who saw service at El Alamein and Monte Cassino (for which he was awarded the Military Cross), the 7th Earl was also very active in the local area. He was a member of Chelsea Borough Council and the last Mayor of Chelsea before it merged with the Royal Borough of Kensington in 1964.

A war hero, who saw service at El Alamein and Monte Cassino (for which he was awarded the Military Cross), the 7th Earl was also very active in the local area. He was a member of Chelsea Borough Council and the last Mayor of Chelsea before it merged with the Royal Borough of Kensington in 1964.

ROYAL COURT THEATRE
1914 – 1945

The First and
 Second World Wars

From across the social spectrum, people were sent to war and those left behind did whatever they could to support the war effort, from making munitions to turning homes into hospitals and caring for the injured. Property in Chelsea was requisitioned for troops and land for the growing of food.

From across the social spectrum, people were sent to war and those left behind did whatever they could to support the war effort, from making munitions to turning homes into hospitals and caring for the injured. Property in Chelsea was requisitioned for troops and land for the growing of food.

1970’S PUNK
1960's onwards

Kings Road

Home to a spectacular ‘swinging 60’s’ scene, Mary Quant opened her boutique ‘Bazaar’ in 1955 and began the mini-skirt revolution. At Vivienne Westward’s clothes store ‘SEX’, punk was born in the ‘70’s. Stomping ground of The Rolling Stones, The Who and Bob Marley (among many others), the King’s Road is where the trendsetters, the famous and the fashionable, lived, shopped and partied.

Home to a spectacular ‘swinging 60’s’ scene, Mary Quant opened her boutique ‘Bazaar’ in 1955 and began the mini-skirt revolution. At Vivienne Westward’s clothes store ‘SEX’, punk was born in the ‘70’s. Stomping ground of The Rolling Stones, The Who and Bob Marley (among many others), the King’s Road is where the trendsetters, the famous and the fashionable, lived, shopped and partied.

OSSIE CLARKE FASHION SHOW
THE WHO, PLAYING AT DUKE OF YORK SQUARE BARRACKS 1966

Cadogan remains committed to Chelsea and playing a part in shaping its future – find out more